Jacob Pycior’s trip to America

This passport holder belonged to Jacob, as he emigrated from Poland to the US. This listing from the Hoboken Historical Museum describes a similar wallet:

Ticket wallet: F. Missler, Bremen. Bahnhofstrasse 30. Polish language issue. No date, circa 1897-1914.

Printed linen with leather edging, 7-1/4″ wide x 9 high folded to 4-1/2″ closed. Two pockets.

Friedrich Missler (1858-1922) was the founder in 1881 of a travel agency in Bremen, Germany, that specialized in passage for emigrants to the United States. From 1885 to 1935, the company used the North German Lloyd Lines which up until World War I had Hoboken as its American home port (and did ocassionally dock here after the war up to the late 1920s.) Missler had many offices outside of Bremen and served Poland and the Slavic countries.

This item does not have a Hoboken provenance, but it is held as a typical example of what passengers arriving in the U.S. at Hoboken piers would have have been using for their ticket and travel documents.

Text outside on front and back:

F. Missler, Bremen (company name and city)
Bahnhofstrasse 30. (street name and number)
[depiction of a four stack ocean liner] (probably the Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse of the North German Lloyd Line which went into service in 1897 and thus helps to date this wallet.)

Text inside printed on both panels:

F. Missler, Bremen
Bahnhofstrasse 30.
[Polish text] Przyjmowanie pasazerow (boarding office for passanger)
na (for the)
pospieszne parostatki do Ameryki (boarding to express steamships to America)
Dom bankowy i wymiana pieniedzy. (bank and money exchange)
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immigration / passenger ships /